Sincerity Strikes at Fort Hood


https://i1.wp.com/i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/00681/adolf-hitler-joke-4_681576c.jpg

https://i2.wp.com/www.longwarjournal.org/images/osama-bin-laden-1998-thumb.jpg

https://i1.wp.com/i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2009/11/06/article-1225712-071B4008000005DC-451_233x305.jpg

Quick quiz:

What do Adolf Hitler

Osama bin Laden

and Nidal Malik Hasan have in common?

Murderous rage?

No doubt.

A wanton disregard for human life?

Undeniably.

But they also share another common trait –

Sincerity.

By now , you undoubtedly know about the tragic event that took place at Fort Hood, Texas last week.

According to the AP:

Hasan, 39, is accused of opening fire on the Army post on Thursday, killing 13 people and wounding 29 before civilian police shot him in the torso. He was taken into custody and eventually moved to Brooke Army Medical Center, where he was in stable condition Monday and able to talk, hospital spokesman Dewey Mitchell said.

The more details emerge, the more it becomes inescapably clear that Hasan’s actions were the work of a devoted and dedicated terrorist.

Prior to the attack he had a long and troubling track record of making pro-Islamist statements both on the internet and to his fellow soldiers.

He even used an academic lecture to deliver the following op-ed on how infidels should be dispatched.

He gave a Grand Rounds presentation. . . You take turns giving a lecture on, you know, the correct treatment of schizophrenia, the right drugs to prescribe for personality disorder, you know, that sort of thing. But instead of giving an academic paper, he gave a lecture on the Koran, and they said it didn’t seem to be just an informational lecture, but it seemed to be his own beliefs. That’s what a lot of people thought.

He talked about how if you’re a nonbeliever the Koran says you should have your head cut off, you should have oil poured down your throat, you should be set on fire. And I said well couldn’t this just be his educating you? And the psychiatrist said yes, but one of the Muslims in the audience, another psychiatrist, raised his hand and was quite disturbed and he said you know, a lot of us don’t believe these things you’re saying, and that there was no place where Hasan couched it as this is what the Koran teaches but you know I don’t believe it. And people actually talked in the hallway afterwards about ‘is he one of these people that’s going to freak out and shoot people someday?’

Now we discover that he had made a number of attempts to contact Osama Bin Laden’s Al Qaida network.

After methodically giving away all of his furniture, he spent the day before the shootings passing out copies of the Koran in his neighborhood.

And when his murderous binge began he was shouting the terrorist war cry – “Allahu akbar!”

To say that Hasan’s actions were not religiously motivated strains credulity.

He was spiritual – and sincere about it.

One of the most important lessons to be learned in the aftermath of this act of terror is not likely to be discussed on the alphabet networks, or even the cable news and commentary shows.

Sincerity, unless it is invested in a worthy object of faith, is worse than worthless.

It is dangerous.

Hitler placed his faith in the idea of a master race and a return to German paganism.

Millions died.

Osama Bin Laden placed his faith in a twisted hope of bringing in a world wide caliphate where sharia law would govern the earth.

His followers were so sincere they willingly flew jet liners into the World Trade Center.

Hasan came under the teaching of a Jihadist cleric who has since fled to Yemen.

https://i1.wp.com/www.muftisays.com/shop/images/products/2-aa_victory_cd.gif

Anwar al-Awlaki was born in New Mexico of Yemeni descent. He lives in Yemen, which is home to at least 300 al-Qaeda militants. According to his website he served as an imam in Denver, San Diego and Falls Church, Virginia

He wrote on his blog yesterday: “Nidal Hassan [sic] is a hero. He is a man of conscience who could not bear the contradiction of being a Muslim and fighting against his own people. No scholar with a grain of Islamic knowledge can deny the clear cut proofs that Muslims today have the right — rather the duty — to fight against American tyranny”

On October 7 he wrote: “America and its allies in the area are plotting against the mujahedeen, nevertheless their growth increases by the day. May Allah grant the true believers victory and grant them steadfastness on His path”

He holds a degree in civil engineering from Colorado State University and a master’s degree in educational leadership from San Diego State University.

He was interviewed by the FBI after the September 11, 2001, attacks when he was accused of serving as “spiritual adviser” to two of the attackers at his mosque in Falls Church. He was detained by Yemeni authorities in August 2006 and held for more than a year as part of a secret investigation.

It is clear that faith will take a person either as high, or as low as its object.

That is why the Bible teaches not faith in a church, or a cleric, or a community.

It teaches faith in Jesus Christ.

Therefore we also, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us lay aside every weight, and the sin which so easily ensnares us, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us,  looking unto Jesus, the author and finisher of our faith, who for the joy that was set before Him endured the cross, despising the shame, and has sat down at the right hand of the throne of God. (Hebrews 12:1-2)

Faith in a church leads to crusades.

Faith in Christ leads to charity.

Faith in a cleric leads to confusion.

Faith in Christ leads to clarity.

Faith in a movement leads people to butcher their brothers.

Faith in Christ leads people to lay their lives down to reach others.

Perhaps the most important question that is raised in the aftermath of the Fort Hood massacre is very personal indeed:

Who are you putting your faith in today?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: