Fred Flintsone’s GPS


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Remember the Flintstones?

The running gag that set up the program was that cave men weren’t all that different from us.

That “modern stone-age family” had to deal with traffic jams and harsh bosses just like we do.

Bowling alleys, airports, less than cooperative house pets, the Flintstones had them all.

Imagine that – primitives whose lives were nasty, brutish and short acting remarkably sophisticated?

What a hoot.

Or maybe not.

The more we uncover about our ancient ancestors, the more we discover that our stereotypical view of their lives and even their level of technological advancement need some serious adjustment.

A remarkable case in point was recently uncovered in Britain.

How a prehistoric sat nav stopped our ancestors

getting lost in Britain

The sophisticated geometric system was based on a stone circle markers.

Our ancestors were able to travel between settlements with pinpoint accuracy thanks to a complex network of hilltop monuments.

Enlarge   sat nav

The prehistoric pointer was based on stone circles and way markers that appear to be placed in a triangular grid

These covered much of southern England and Wales and included now famous landmarks such as Stonehenge and The Mount.

Researcher Tom Brooks analysed 1,500 prehistoric monuments, including Stonehenge and Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, and found them all to be on a grid of isosceles triangles – those with two sides of equal length – each pointing to the next site.

He believes this proves there were keen mathematicians among the ancient Britons 5,000-6,000 years ago, at least two millennia before the Greeks who were supposed to have discovered geometry.

Many monuments are 250 miles or more away but GPS co-ordinates now show all are accurate to within 100 metres and provided a simple map for ancient Britons to follow.

Incredibly, the triangles still exist today as many medieval churches, abbeys and cathedrals were constructed on top of the original stone circle markers.

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